Help with Muscle Pain and Recovery after Surgery in Norwich Part 1

Just recently I had to undergo an “Inguinal Hernia Repair “ambulatory surgery”.

I was acutely aware of physical, muscular nerve related (Myalgia) pain, in my lower back when I came round from the operation.

As a Sports Injury Therapist, I realised that the muscular pain could be dealt with, but because of the surgery. It had to be done in the right way as to not jeopardise my recovery.

Drugs I believe only treat the symptoms they do not treat the cause, but after surgery we do need pain relief, some cannot take medication or find they have a bad reaction to it, we all heal at different rates, some people a lot shorter time than others, I do however believe that by helping ourselves, being proactive in our recovery and rehabilitation, in this sort of situation, it can reduce the healing time considerably for everyone undergoing this sort of surgery.

So here is my short account, in the hope that it will help others who have to go through this sort of surgery.

Stability is the name of the game.

The complexity of physical motion is exchanged for stability as the body ages .We want Pain free ability to move.

Here is the how and the why! 

The two muscle s that had been affected; during the operation were the “Multifidus” and the “Transversus abdominal”. It was essential to get these working again, these muscles are vital; the Transversus abdominal for instance supports your abdominal wall, aids in forced expiration, The two muscle s that had been affected; during the operation were the “Multifidus” and the “Transversus abdominal”. It was essential to get these working again, these muscles are vital; the Transversus abdominal for instance supports your abdominal wall, aids in forced expiration, intra abdominal pressure, as all abdominal muscles work moment to moment as we move, they provide the tension required to translate forces from the lower limbs to the upper limbs

Intra abdominal pressure, as all abdominal muscles work moment to moment as we move, they provide the tension required to translate forces from the lower limbs to the upper limbs.  The Transversus abdominal is the deepest of these muscles and each one from right to left wraps up the organs horizontally and its fascial attachments include lumbar vertebrae rib cage iliac crest and the inguinal ligament. It also provides support of internal organs and tension support for lift for L2 and L3 of the lumber vertebra. The Multifidus extends laterally, it also flexes and rotates the vertebrae column and it also extends laterally to rotate the pelvis.Transversus abdominal is the deepest of these muscles and each one from right to left wraps up the organs horizontally and its fascial attachments include lumbar vertebrae rib cage iliac crest and the inguinal ligament. It also provides support of internal organs and tension support for lift for L2 and L3 of the lumber vertebra. The Multifidus extends laterally, it also flexes and rotates the vertebrae column and it also extends laterally to rotate the pelvis.

As you can see they do a lot of work, Spinal integrity relies on the combined ability of both of the Transversus abdominal and the Multifidus muscles to maintain the pelvic stability and rotate and stabilize the spinal structure .

Recommended Posts